Written by Vet Tech

Corman Shepherd : Corgi & German Shepherd Mix

Amber LaRock
Written by: Amber LaRock, Vet Tech
Discover the fantastic Corman Shepherd. They are loyal, brave, and a little stubborn. Learn everything about this breed now.

The Corman Shepherd is an adorable mixture of the two popular breeds; the Corgi and the German Shepherd. With their courageous attitude, cute appearance and loyalty to their family, this breed is filling homes around the world.

In this article, we’ll dive into the details of the Corman Shepherd breed and give you some helpful tips on how to welcome them into your home.

History Of The Corman Shepherd

Though this crossbreed has likely been around for quite some time, they are just recently gaining popularity in the breeding world.

Most likely due to the public’s adoration of a pup with short and stubby legs, this crossbreed first gained recognition in the early 2000s.

As the demand for mixed breed dogs began to climb, many believe that breeders were looking to combine the Corgi’s adorable features with the loyalty of the German Shepherd.

As people began to fall in love with this crossbreed, they were soon referred to as a beloved designer breed.

Unlike some other designer breeds, the Corman Shepherd is found in many shelters or rescues around the country.

Since both breeds are so common in the dog world, you may not need to resort to purchasing from a breeder if you are set on bringing a German Shepherd into your family.

Appearance Of The Corman Shepherd

The Corman Shepherd’s appearance is quite possibly the reason as to why they have become so popular. With their stocky frame, short legs, and big ears; it’s no wonder so many people have fallen for this breed.

Since this breed is fairly new and is a mixture of two incredibly different breeds, there are no set standards as to size or color. When you mix the German Shepherd and the Corgi you can expect to see a product somewhere in the middle.

They typically weigh anywhere from 30-70 pounds and can stand up to 15 inches in height.

In order to have an idea of how big your Corman Shepherd will be, try multiplying their 5-month weight by two. This method can usually bring you to a ballpark range of how large your pup will be as an adult.

The Corman Shepherd’s coat is often a blend of two colors. Though there is some variation due to this being a mixture of two widely different dogs, they are usually brown and black or white and tan.

With the Corgi and the German Shepherds both having dense fur, you can expect their fur to be just as plush. Their thick coat can result in a large amount of shedding, so it’s best to brush your Corman Shepherd each day to reduce the loose hair in your home.

Personality Of The Corman Shepherd

This breed is usually described as a fun-loving ball of energy. They absolutely love to play, especially if it involves their favorite human.

You will have no difficulty encouraging your pup to attend you on your daily walks, but you may have an issue with then nipping at your heels. Since both breeds were originally created for herding, you will often see characteristics that are reminiscent of their working past.

Due to the German Shepherd in this mixture, this breed can be very territorial and protective. Many Corman shepherd owners refer to this breed as their own personal alert dog, as they will always let their owners know if they are perceiving anyone as a threat.

Because of this quality, it’s best to socialize them at a young age. If this characteristic is not addressed, it can turn into aggression as they age.

Possibility For Aggression

Since the Corman Shepherd is 50% of one of the world’s most well-known guard dogs, this can always bring the possibility of aggression if not properly socialized.

The Cormon Shepherd is known for being protective over their owner and home and paired with their high energy level, this can result in unfavorable behavior.

It’s important to begin socialization of your Corman Shepherd from the moment they enter your home. Socialization is best started between 8-12 weeks of age but can begin at any point that you bring your new furry friend into your life.

Try your best to expose them to new animals and humans in and outside of your home, and this should greatly reduce the risk of aggression in your Corman Shepherd.

If it seems like your Corman Shepherd is extremely territorial no matter how hard you try to socialize them, this breed can benefit from professional training.

Overall Health Of The Corman Shepherd

The Corman Shepherd’s average lifespan is anywhere from 10-12 years of age. While they can live long and happy lives, there are some medical conditions that can affect this breed. Some of these conditions include:

Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a common problem in German Shepherds. This condition refers to the abnormal formation of the hip joint which can lead to painful complications as this condition progresses.

Since hip dysplasia can cause the hip joints to ear down over time, dogs often experience pain, limping, lameness, slowing down with time, and other pain-related symptoms.

Since this disease can be due to genetics, it’s important to have a medical history of your Corman Shepherd’s parents if possible.

Arthritis

Arthritis is the inflammation or wearing down of the joints over time. Since German Shepherds and Corgis are both prone to this disease, it’s recommended to start your adult Corman Shepherd on joint supplements as a preventative plan.

Arthritis can lead to pain, difficulty walking, lameness, slowing down, difficulty getting up, and other pain-related symptoms.

Gastric Bloat (GDV)

Gastric bloat is a medical condition that affects deep-chested dogs. In GDV the stomach will flip on itself, trapping the contents of the stomach and cutting off circulation.

This condition requires medical attention ASAP, as it is fatal if not treated quickly. Symptoms of bloat include a distended abdomen, retching with no vomit production, weakness, pale gums, panting, and collapse.

Skin Allergies

Both German Shepherds and Corgis are prone to skin allergies, so it’s best to keep an eye out for the signs. Dogs can experience skin allergies due to an allergy to their food, a contact allergy, or allergens present in the environment.

Some dogs will experience dry skin, itchy skin, skin irritation and redness, sores on the skin, and even secondary infection from these complications.

Back Problems

Due to being half Corgi, this breed has an elongated back. Any breed with long body shape is at an increased risk of the disc disease and other back injuries, so it’s important to be aware of these conditions from the start.

Try your best to limit strenuous activity, jumping off furniture, or any other activity that can result in back injury for your Corman Shepherd.

Training Your Corman Shepherd

The Corman Shepherd is an extremely intelligent breed, so they are often eager to learn. Early training and socialization is important for your Corman pup, so it’s best to take advantage of their intelligence and get to work as early as possible.

Though they are smart, they are known to be quite stubborn. It’s important for your training routine to be engaging and positive in order to keep their attention and keep them coming back for more.

Since the Corman Shepherd has a possibility of aggression if not properly trained, it’s important to follow a training guideline that offers positive reinforcement.

This breed does not handle punishment and negative enforcement well, so you will receive the best results when approaching their training with positivity and care.

Exercise And Your Corman Shepherd

The Corman Shepherd can be a big ball of energy, especially in their younger years. This breed does best in an active home, or one that is dedicated to at least 30 minutes of daily playtime.

Due to their love of spending time with their humans and their deep love for play, this is the perfect companion to bring along on your outdoor adventures.

Daily exercise is important for this breed as they can begin to display undesirable behaviors such as destruction, barking, or aggression if they are not properly exercised. If you live in a home without a yard or prefer a more sedentary approach to life, this may not be the breed for you.

Important Tips For Your Corman Shepherd

Now that we’ve covered the details that make the Cormon Shepherd such a wonderful companion, let’s cover a few of the most important tips before you welcome them into your home.

  • Since this is a mixed breed, this breed can vary greatly in size.
  • This breed can be extremely protective of their home and family, so early socialization is important to help reduce the chance of aggression.
  • This breed has a lot of energy, so they will need at least 30 minutes of daily exercise.
  • This breed won’t likely do well in a small home or a home without a yard.
  • This breed is intelligent, so it’s important to make sure they have stimulating play time and plenty of ways to help them avoid boredom.
  • This breed is prone to hip dysplasia, arthritis, and back problems so it’s best to speak with your vet about daily joint supplements as they enter adulthood.

Summary

This unique breed can be an intelligent and fun-loving addition to your home.

If you are an active person that is dedicated to playtime with your favorite furry friend, then the Corman Shepherd is the perfect pup for you!